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Tuesday, July 28, 2020 | History

1 edition of Behaviour and densities of ringed seals (Phoca hispida) during haul out in the high Arctic, June 1977 found in the catalog.

Behaviour and densities of ringed seals (Phoca hispida) during haul out in the high Arctic, June 1977

K. J. Finley

Behaviour and densities of ringed seals (Phoca hispida) during haul out in the high Arctic, June 1977

by K. J. Finley

  • 121 Want to read
  • 36 Currently reading

Published by LGL Limited in Toronto .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Seals (Animals)

  • Edition Notes

    Bibliography: p. 102-105.

    Statementprepared for Polar Gas Project by K.J. Finley. --
    SeriesPolar Gas Project. Polar gas environmental program -- [no.34]
    ContributionsL.G.L. Limited, Environmental Research Associates, Polar Gas Project
    Classifications
    LC ClassificationsTD125 .P6 no.34
    The Physical Object
    Paginationix, 107 p. :
    Number of Pages107
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL26546959M

    MARINE MAMMAL SCIENCE, VOL. 21, NO. 2, seal densities near Northstar if such changes had r, seal densities during spring were not significantly affected by proximity to Northstar in Habitat, temporal, and weather factors did have significant effects on seal densities. This study shows that effects of the Northstar oil development on local. and local solar time. Ringed seals were rela-tively common in nearshore fast ice and pack ice, with lower densities in offshore pack ice. The average density of ringed seals was seals km. 2. in (range – ) and seals km. 2. in (range –), with the highest densities of ringed seals found in coastal.

    The Ringed seal is named for the small light-colored rings or circles scattered on its back throughout the darker hair. The Ringed seal pup has woolly, thick, whitish fur when it is born, known as ‘lanugo’. As it grows, its fur becomes finer and a little longer than that of adults, dark gray on the upperparts, and silver on the underside.   To assess whether demographic declines of Arctic species at the southern limit of their range will be gradual or punctuated, we compared large-scale environmental patterns including sea ice dynamics to ringed seal (Pusa hispida) reproduction, body condition, recruitment, and stress in Hudson Bay from to Aerial surveys suggested a gradual decline in seal density from to

    The total Baltic ringed seal population, currently 12 seals, is predicted to amount to a mean of 30 seals in the year , which is only 16 % of the population size in the beginning of the twentieth century (Harding and Harkonen ), and the population will thus remain small compared with earlier conditions. The risk for extirpation. Ringed seals (Phoca hispida) are a widespread circumpolar species. They occur in the Beaufort, Chukchi, and Bering Seas, usually in association with sea ice (Burns, ). During winter, ringed seals make and maintain breathing holes in the sea ice (Smith and Stirling, ; Smith and Hammill, ). Some holes are enlarged to provide ac-.


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Behaviour and densities of ringed seals (Phoca hispida) during haul out in the high Arctic, June 1977 by K. J. Finley Download PDF EPUB FB2

Numbers of ringed seals hauled out on the ice began to increase in early June. Numbers on the ice were highest from to hours Central Standard Time and lowest (average 40–50% of peak) in early morning. Seals commonly remained on the ice for several hours, and occasionally (during calm weather) for > 48 by: The ringed seal (Pusa hispida or Phoca hispida), also known as the jar seal, as netsik or nattiq by the Inuit, is an earless seal inhabiting the Arctic and sub-Arctic regions.

The ringed seal is a relatively small seal, rarely greater than m in length, with a distinctive patterning of dark spots surrounded by light grey rings, hence its common : Phocidae. Download Citation | Haul-out behaviour and densities of ringed seals (Phoca hispida) in the Barrow Strait area, N.W.T | Numbers of ringed seals hauled out on the ice began to increase in early.

Haul-out behaviour and densities of ringed seals (Phoca hispida) in the Barrow Strait area, NWT. Canadian Journal of Zoology – Hammill, M. and Smith, T. Cited by:   The ringed seal is a member of the subfamily Phocinae of the family Phocidae.

Within this subfamily, Pusa hispida, along with four other genera, the Phoca, Halichoerus, Histriophoca, and Pagophilus constitute a well marked clade designated as tribe Behaviour and densities of ringed seals book, which is distinguished from all other phocids by a unique karyotype (2n=32), and a white lanugo (natal fur).Cited by: 4.

seals seen on the ice is needed as a basis for studying the ef-fects of industry on observed ringed seal densities. The pri-mary objective of this paper is to investigate how the local abundance of ringed seals is related to various habitat fac-tors and how the haulout behaviour of seals is influenced by temporal and weather factors.

The under-ice movements and behavior of ringed seals, the most ice-adapted of northern pinnipeds, were investigated in Fifteen ringed seals were captured 1 or more times in nets.

A monitoring program documented densities of ringed seals, Phoca hispida, before and during development of the Northstar oil field in the central Alaskan Beaufort surveys of seals on landfast ice were conducted during the springs of to (pre-construction) and – (construction and drilling).

Acoustic and vibration data were acquired during the ice-covered seasons. This study examined the intra- and inter-annual haul-out behaviour of 60 ringed seals equipped with Satellite Relay Data Loggers before [– (n = 22)] and after [– (n = 38)] the sea-ice decline occurred.

In total, ringed seals hauled out 5–20% of the time (between August and May) with a mean haul-out duration of h. Studies of the behavioral ecology of seals hauled out on the sea ice at Popham Bay (64°17′ N, 65°30′ W) southeastern Baffin Island were conducted from 8 May to 6 June and 1 May to 20 June Similar densities and seasonal changes in numbers of hauled out seals were seen in both years.

However, seal densities during spring were not significantly affected by proximity to Northstar in – Habitat, temporal, and weather factors did have significant effects on seal densities.

This study shows that effects of the Northstar oil development on local distribution of basking ringed seals are no more than slight, and are small. Changing environmental conditions in the Pacific Arctic are expected to affect ice-adapted marine food webs.

As such, understanding ringed seal (Pusa hispida) dive and haul-out behavior is vital to understanding if and how these environmental changes affect seal foraging behavior. Working with Alaska Native subsistence hunters, we tagged 14 adult and 20 subadult ringed seals with satellite. Different populations have different names and some variation in behavior and appearance.

But ringed seals—the smallest seal species—get their name from the light-colored circular patterns. Ringed seals are the smallest and most common Arctic seal. They get their name from the small, light-colored circles, or rings, that are scattered throughout the darker hair on their backs.

Ringed seals are circumpolar and are found in all seasonally ice-covered seas of the Northern Hemisphere and in certain freshwater lakes. The behaviour of ringed seal pups is of course in conflict with a maximum efficiency of energy retention, and the metabolic overhead paid by tinged seal moth- ers is the highest among phocid seals.

Ringed seal pups store only about 36% of the energy they receive via milk as body tissue. The density of Arctic ringed seals has not been estimated in its entire distribution area.

The estimate of about 5 million Arctic ringed seals is thus partly based on extrapolation. Based on surveys average densities of ringed seals has been calculated for various types of sea ice (ex. fast ice in fjords, fast ice along the coasts and pack ice).

In total, 68 ringed seals were collected from an area km east of Paktoa in Mayandin order to examine body condition and reproductive status of the local seal population. The collected specimens showed the ringed seals in this area to be in good body condition with ample fat stores, in normal reproductive status.

Ringed seals vary greatly in size, reaching anywhere from to feet ( to meters) and weighing between 70 and pounds (30 and kilograms). Range. Ringed seals live in the Arctic seas and the North Pacific Ocean, as far south as Japan.

They. Seal behaviour. Our results show that ringed seals in Kongsfjorden strongly favour the terminus of Kronebreen, a marine-terminating glacier, as a. Haulout patterns indicated that ringed seals transitioned to basking behavior in late May and early June, and that the largest proportion of seals (60–68%) was hauled out between and local solar time.

Ringed seals were relatively common in nearshore fast ice and pack ice, with lower densities in offshore pack ice. The average density of ringed seals was seals km-2 in (range – ) and seals km-2 in (range –), with the highest densities of ringed seals found in coastal waters south of Kivalina and near Kotzebue Sound.

The estimated abundance of ringed seals for the entire study area was similar in (, seals.What do we know about Ringed Seals? Ringed Seals are known for the characteristic light-coloured ring marks on the dark grey pelt of adult animals. They are the smallest of all living seal species.

Male Ringed Seals reach m in length and females remain slightly smaller. Newborn pups are just 60 cm in length and weigh about kg.Introduction. Ringed seals (Phoca hispida) are the most numerous of all seal species in high arctic areas, and have thereby an important role in the constitute the main prey for polar bears (Ursus maritimus) and they forage on a number of fish and squid species, but also crustaceans are important food r, most information on the ecology of ringed seals have been.